BACKGROUND

 

As the European Union seeks to pull through the economic crisis and EU leaders reflect on what direction to take in future, these are the most important European elections to date.

 

They do not only allow voters to pass judgment on EU leaders’ efforts to tackle the eurozone crisis and to express their views on plans for closer economic and political integration; they are also the first elections since the Lisbon Treaty of 2009 that give the European Parliament quite a few important new powers.

 

One major new development introduced by the Treaty is that, when the EU member states nominate the next president of the European Commission to succeed José Manuel Barroso in autumn 2014, they will – for the first time – have to take into account the European election results. The new Parliament must endorse this candidate: it ‘elects’ the Commission president, in the words of the Treaty. This means voters now have a clear say in who takes over the head of EU government.

 

The new political majority that will emerge from the elections will also shape the European legislation over the next five years in areas ranging from the single market to civil liberties, trade to foreign affairs. The Parliament – the only directly elected EU institution – is now a linchpin of the European decision-making system and has an equal say with national governments on nearly all EU laws.

 

To be clearer, in daily life, these elections will have an impact on agriculture, fishing, economy or ecology.

 

We have to take into account the high rate of euroscepticism before the elections: many people might not vote because they don’t believe the EU is a good idea.

 

The CASE OF FRANCE

 

1952

ACCESSION DATE

74 MEPS

MEPS TO BE ELECTED IN 2014: the number of MEP’s depends on the number of inhabitants in each country.

  • 550,000km²

AREA

  • 65.6million

POPULATION

 

In France, the list of MEP’s shall not be affiliated with some political party. The European Parliament has its own. (7 parties).

Advertisements